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20121222
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)
have been to the doctor and all of those things. this is the way that technology can help people) distant connect with us. 75% of our users say that we work with others to provide care and support. today, ties is three years old, and we have learned a lot about lessons with the good life. our number-one lesson is that no one should have to face thelma's, disability, or caregiving on their own. there are growing numbers -- why we did pay attention to this, constantly reaching out in creating our own networks, keeping them informed is one major reason, there are more and more of us living alone. 40% of people over 60 live alone. we are more vulnerable in terms of how we are living and we are more vulnerable because those of us are living with chronic and complex diseases. that can lead and capacity to it is a very positive thing to do. what we might think of as our desire is for the company and so on, our health is a social affair. our health is intimately tied with our connections and support. when we have a good network around us, we heal more quickly, we live longer. and when we
with your friends as well. we are all lucky to live in san francisco, because so many of our technology companies have located their headquarters here in san francisco. [cheers and applause] and because they're located here, we can always ask them for a favor here and there and make sure no one is left out, because that is what we do in government. david chiu and i come from backgrounds where we do not want to leave anybody behind. we want everybody to enjoy the riches of technology. we want them to enjoy the economy in san francisco. that is why we're working so hard to make sure our central marketplace is welcoming of all these technology companies, making sure that we can work with other cities. i am very lucky to be part of the u.s. conference of mayors, and they allow me to represent san francisco as the innovative center for all the rest of the cities across the country. so we get to compare information and there. what these days i will get to talk to you while i am in washington, d.c., and you can hear what i am saying across there, so we can enjoy it -- wherever i go, you know i
keep being leaders in technology and celebrating our status, but also implementing the programs to help us continue that very nice title we have, the innovation capital of the world. and i am here today in collaboration with board president david chiu and so many others from our committee on information technology, spur, our different various city departments, really trying to improve on what we've done already. back in 2009 then mayor gavin newsome to the light of all of us had introduced that we ought to really establish some guidelines to open up our city's data. and in the year later, the board, less legislation, the first open data legislation in san francisco that made us cutting edge throughout the country, the first to come out and say to everybody in the public, to people who wanted to create businesses, wanted to look at the city with kind of an open invitation to involve themselves with what the city had. and part of that really neat understanding was that we were holding onto so much of our own data in our own silos with our own very focused obligations that we had, and not
>> good morning, everybody. welcome to the technology summit. we are looking forward to a fantastic day. we are going to start with a demonstration of the wii system. it is an interactive gaming system that allows people to play different activities and participate in different fitness activities together. a lot of wii systems, about 40, are being deployed around the city to different senior centers and residents facilities to encourage older adults to get more involved with physical activity using technology. we're going to spend the first 30 minutes or so demonstrating the wii. not only will we demonstrate how to use it, but we will doe demonstrate adaptive devices so that it can be an inclusive activity for all adults and children. my name is dr. chris thompson from the university of san francisco. go, dons. 1855. i have not been there that long. i am in the department of exercise and sports science. i think it is a good match for me to be demonstrating the wii, which is a good physical activity. i am joined on the stage by a student, not from usf, but from san francisco state. w
to the core of may. and that is why i have learned the necessary needs of technology whto learn and to grw at to do things. and why you and i need the things you're going to hear in just a couple of minutes. i just want to take a quick moment as you get settled. you will have to stop talking because i will not talk over you. you, too. i'm going to count to ten. i usually don't have to finish to ten. when you think of technology in the world today, we can't even imagine what is going to have the month from now. think of the things that have been eaten up. we used to have payphones. they are gone. the cellphone 8 it up. the cellphone 8 of the camera industry. you don't need to buy a camera. the cellphone 8 the watch industry. i don't even wear a watch. you can go through the list. he you don't have to go to the bank anymore. take a picture of a check and make a deposit. look at all the things that we have changed. and change every day. if we can't imagine what is going to happen by christmas time. you don't even have to go to the pharmacy to say, fill this out. pick up a phone, punch in, go
installed. 30 minutes, solar basics, stay with me. >> let's talk about the technology, what is it and how does it work? there are three types of solar actually when you sauk about solar. i want to avoid the confusion to make sure we're focusing on the right one. two of them involve heating water and they're very viable technologies, can be very coast effective but we're not going to deal with them right now. one is solar pool heating. it pumps the water up there, heats it, runs it through there, the sun heats it and back into the pool. this one is called solar thermal or solar hot water. it heats domestic hot water or d.h.w. that's your hot water that you use four showers and dishwashers. we're going to talk about solar electric. they have the same technology as computer chips. they're similar in structure to that tran cystor-like computer chip technology based on silicon. the best thing about them is there are no moving parts and they last a long time. there are cells, modules, and arrays. a cell is one of these pieces here. it's a small unit wired together in a certain way to produce ha
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the north facade. two different levels of
. a big logo slide. >> and we're supposed to be about the technology. >> imagine a big stop bullying speak up logo on the slide behind me. >> say that again. >> stop bullying, speak up is the name of the campaign and a nice transition. my complements to everyone in the room. if i have learned everything in the last four years while researching bullying prevention and for our age group and the kids in the second through seventh grade it's that not only does it take a village but a village of people who are willing to partner and collaborate with each other and speak not only to adults about this issue but speak to children and i think it's an interesting transition from mia's work to mine. still not mine. >> it is but -- >> and the role we play at cartoon network and thousands of kids at home everyday and the role we play is taking that information, translating it and content on the line and when kids come independently to our screens to play games and watch television and do a variety of things we have information for them on information they care deeply part. in 2008 as research we do
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
or disabled have unfortunately historically been at the margins of new technologies when they are introduced. today, as broadband internet brings expanded opportunities in health care, education, and civic participation, projects like this one here in san francisco are critical to making sure that all communities have access to life changing technologies. [applause] high-speed internet connections make it possible for patients in rural areas to consult with medical specialists who are hundreds of miles away, for students to take online classes and universities across the country, and for governments to deliver services more efficiently and more easily to their constituents. for seniors, especially those whose families may live in different states or in different countries, broadband allows families to bond together in a way that telephone just never did. my own parents and all live in mexico city, and we are lucky because we both of broadband connections in our home. if a few weeks ago we got on skype. we set up the computer in our kitchen, and they set it up in their dining room but they in
is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices online. we are also working on electronic bidding systems. another way we can reduce the paperwork and all the other issues tied with the procurements. i live in san francisco. i am a rate-payer. i really care about the way we spend our money. systems like this that will allow transparency, clarity, accountability, and efficiency -- i think systems like this need to be applied to all parts of the city. we really strive to lead and embraced technology so we can be ahead of the game. [applause] >> we are spending $15 million per week just on our water system. that does not ha
'm going to go down the line. as we get to our military partners i'd ask if there's other technologies that you think that you have that you want to share about that may be helpful as we start to get into fire season. please share those with us. ray, if you'd like to start. >> sure, thank you. first off, thanks for being here, it's my first time being here and i think it's an outstanding venue to meet the cooperating agencies and talk about policies and ways we can improve our response to the public that we serve. we look at title 10, title 32 resources in all aspects, all risk venue, like i said, not only aircraft but we utilize ltax for our agreements with la county fire, to mobilize fire engines to catalina island. we look at resources for debris cleaning, i found out there's a desalization battalion for fresh water, that's an i object credible resource for an earthquake. there's a variety of dod resources that cal fire can provide in a statewide environment. i think the biggest thing for me, there's several scenarios that are challenging us, one of which and one of our fears,
, even in the face of all these technology companies that are coming here and helping us uplift our economy, even within that success, you hear me talking about the people who aren't getting those jobs, the people who are making decisions everyday in our streets, in our community, and i will not be mincing words -- it is in the bay view. in in the visitation valley. it is in the mission where their dispute resolution is at the end of a gun and this is the way they're talking. this is the way they're dealing with each other and then with anybody who attempts to interfere with that. you have heard me say even with the success of all of our departments and everything that they're doing i can't give a job to a dead youth no matter what we do, and so i can have the best training programs. i can have a high number of jobs available. eric mcdonald and i can create 10,000 jobs in the summer, but if our youth are resolving their differences with the point of a gun or the end of a knife those jobs are never going to be available to them. how do we interrupt that violence? i cannot put i
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
with the history of the health data initiative launched by then the hhs health and human services chief technology officer todd park, we sought to have a health data palooza proceeded by health data jambs or modeling sessions, jams sounded more fun, we can invite entrepreneurs in and see what can be done and created real products within a few months. that is being rolled out at education, energy, treasury, u.s. aid, other agencies as well. these programs are celebrating the use of open data and hopefully will provide some additional support. i think there are even folks here who have been part of these events. we're excited for that continued support and hope you can all join this initiative in the neutral. -- future. >> so, earlier you were talking a little about kind of how san francisco came in in terms of actually ading the officer. more broadly how do you think san francisco compares and what are some of the other cities that are doing really well in terms of open data? >> i should be clear. when san francisco is third, we have a pact. i'll add to that actually. what's great in san francisco
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 88 (some duplicates have been removed)